Click here to narrow your options by answering a few questions.

Prostate Cancer
Treatment Guide™

Experts in Treating Prostate Cancer
Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
Therapy News View Procedures Share Your Experience

Hormone
Therapy

Prostate Hormone Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth. Prostate Hormone
Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment. Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment.

click to learn more

Learn More

Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection. Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection.

click to learn more

 

Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments. Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use. Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use.

click to learn more

Learn More

Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures. Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Experiences


Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.Hormone Therapy
Experiences

Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.

click to learn more


Learn More

Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy –
Anti-androgen

Anti-androgens are another class of hormone therapy drugs that are used in prostate cancer treatment. Anti – androgens affect the receptors of the prostate cells’ nuclei and prevent the reception of testosterone. These anti-hormone drugs are sometimes used as monotherapy for prostate cancer patients who are in early stages with low risk tumor features. Anti - androgens may also be used in conjunction with either surgical or medical castration to ablate 100 percent of the body’s testosterone.

Anti - androgens work by blocking the testosterone receptors in the prostate cells. Normally, testosterone would bind with these receptors and fuel the growth of prostate cancer cells. Some researchers believe that men with a higher number of hormone receptors will more quickly experience hormone refractory cancer, which occurs when the prostate cancer cells grow resistant to the hormone deprivation. With the receptors blocked, testosterone cannot “feed” the prostate. Anti - androgen therapy does not eliminate testosterone and therefore may have fewer or less severe side effects than those associated with surgical and medical castration.

When patients stop benefiting from the use of anti-androgens, some patients have found stopping hormone therapy to be effective for combating prostate cancer. This phenomenon is referred to as the “anti – androgen withdrawal effect.” For this reason, some doctors will use intermittent hormone therapy, where patients use the drugs until their levels drop then stop, then begin the drugs again when testosterone levels rise. Other doctors prescribe six months on and six months off as intermittent therapy.

The three most common anti - androgen drugs used for prostate cancer hormone therapy are flutamide, bicalutamide, and nilutamide. These drugs are taken orally as either a tablet or a pill. A single dose usually contains between 50 mg and 150 mg, depending on the patient’s needs and doctor’s prescription. Doctors encourage their patients to take the drug around the same time everyday to ensure a steady stream of therapy. Patients who forget to take a dose and are close to a time where they usually take the next dose, should not take a double dose. Taking a dose around the same time each day will decrease the incidence of some side effects, such as nausea or vomiting.

Hormone therapy can involve unpleasant and, in more rare cases, dangerous side effects. Because there are multiple anti - androgen drugs available in United States as well as Canada and the United Kingdom, patients with serious side effects should speak with their doctors about possibly changing drugs. Some doctors may change the form of hormone therapy, but in other cases doctors will encourage their patients to continue. In some cases, the side effects will dissipate as the body gets used to the drug and the androgen ablation.

The use of castration in addition to anti - androgens is called combined androgen blockade (CAB). The use of anti - androgens a few weeks before LHRH agonists are started has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of hormone flare that can be painfully dangerous for patients with distant bone metastasis. Anti – androgens can also be used after surgical or medical castration stops being effective. There are a few studies that indicate using anti - androgens as monotherapy may be slightly less effective than medical or surgical castration as monotherapy. Other studies found no difference in the survival rates of people who had used only one form of treatment.

 
 
 
 

 
Prostate Cancer Patient Discussion Group

 

 
 
 

Coping with Prostate Cancer      Are You at Risk for Prostate Cancer?      Prostate Cancer News     Glossary

 Home     Contact Us     Disclaimer    Privacy Policy     Resources     Add URL      Site Map