Click here to narrow your options by answering a few questions.
   

Prostate Cancer Treatment Guide

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
Therapy News View Procedures Share Your Experience

Hormone
Therapy

Prostate Hormone Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth. Prostate Hormone
Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment. Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment.

click to learn more

 

Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection. Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments. Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use. Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use.

click to learn more

Learn More

Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures. Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures.

click to learn more

Learn More

Hormone Therapy
Experiences


Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.Hormone Therapy
Experiences

Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.

click to learn more


Learn More

Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Hormone Therapy and Prostate Cancer Patients

Patients who want to pursue any type of hormone therapy should take the following into account:

  • Not all hormone therapies are the same; there are different side effects that occur with each
  • Patients with bone metastasis should not take LHRH agonists
  • Hormone therapy does not destroy prostate cancer, but controls the growth for a period of time

Patients who want to consider hormone therapy as adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy should speak with their doctors about which one is right for them. Patients with recurrent prostate cancer who want to pursue monotherapy alone should also speak with their doctors. Read on to see when hormone therapy is most often used.


Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy
Hormone therapy does not cure prostate cancer, but androgen ablation can be a useful way to augment another therapy or to control the growth of prostate cancer. When hormone therapy is given as primary treatment, hormone therapy is usually referred to as a neoadjuvant prostate cancer treatment. Neoadjuvant refers to a “pre-therapy” that is given before the main therapy. Before most other prostate cancer treatments, hormone therapy is given to shrink the prostate gland and make the main therapy more effective.
Noninvasive procedures such as brachytherapy and cryotherapy are not as effective when administered to a prostate gland that has a high volume. In most cases, implanting seeds or creating effective ice balls may not be feasible due to the size of the gland. An enlarged prostate gland increases the likelihood of the pubic arch interfering with the needles. During prostatectomy, an enlarged prostate gland may cause a surgeon to miss a piece of the prostate gland, which increases the likelihood of recurrence. In external beam radiation therapy, an enlarged prostate gland gives a bigger “target,” but increases the likelihood that healthy organs and tissue will be damaged by radioactive energy.

Prostate Cancer Salvage Therapy
When primary treatment fails to eliminate all of a patient’s prostate cancer, hormone therapy may be used as salvage therapy. Hormone therapy may be used as adjuvant for another salvage therapy. Adjuvant means that a therapy is used to enhance the effectiveness of another treatment. Patients preparing to undergo cryotherapy after radiotherapy fails, will sometimes take hormone therapy, specifically an anti-androgen. The anti-androgen will shrink the prostate gland enough to give the surgeon a few millimeters to avoid damaging the rectum.

Recurrent Prostate Cancer
Patients who have undergone therapy but are now seeing their PSA levels begin to rise or whose doctors find irregularities in their DRE’s may find that they have recurrent prostate cancer. Hormone therapy will not cure the disease, but, for a time, hormone therapy can halt or dramatically slow the growth and the spread of the tumor. When treatment stops working, the disease is called hormone refractory prostate cancer.

Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis
Patients who have distant bone metastasis associated with the advanced stages of prostate cancer cannot take LHRH agonists due to a phenomenon called hormone flare. Hormone flare is sometimes called tumor flare, and occurs when the level of testosterone spikes for a period of 7 to 10 days after beginning the agonist. Flare can be extremely dangerous for patients with bone metastasis. Some men may also be eligible for combined hormone blockade in which 100% of the body's androgens (produced in both the testicles and the adrenal glands) are blocked. LHRH antagonists do not cause hormone flare, but these drugs are less often prescribed because they can cause a severe allergic reaction in some men.

 
 
 

 
Prostate Cancer Patient Discussion Group

 

 
 
 

Coping with Prostate Cancer      Are You at Risk for Prostate Cancer?      Prostate Cancer News     Glossary

 Home     Contact Us     Disclaimer    Privacy Policy     Resources     Add URL      Site Map