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Prostate Cancer Treatment Guide

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
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Hormone
Therapy

Prostate Hormone Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth. Prostate Hormone
Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth.

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Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment. Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment.

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Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection. Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection.

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Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments. Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments.

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Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use. Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.

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Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures. Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures.

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Hormone Therapy
Experiences


Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.Hormone Therapy
Experiences

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy – LHRH Antagonist

Because the growth of prostate cancer is fueled by the male sex hormone testosterone, doctors can use chemical castration to ablate 90 to 95 percent of the body’s supply. Chemical castration interferes with signals in the brain that tell the testicles to start testosterone production. The hypothalamus in the brain first detects that levels of testosterone are dropping and releases luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) also called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). LHRH or GnRH act as a messenger and fill in receptors of the pituitary gland to report the lowering levels of testosterone. The pituitary gland releases luteinizing hormones (LH) that travel to the testicles.

An antagonist inhibits the action of a cell by filling in receptors. A LHRH or GnRH antagonist mimics the shape of normal LHRH then fills in the receptors on the pituitary gland. Not receiving the message from the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland does not release LH. The testicles never produce testosterone and the body’s levels drop.

LHRH and GnRH antagonists should not be confused with agonists. LHRH antagonists are generally used only for advanced prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Unlike the agonists, LHRH or GnRH antagonists do not produce hormone flare. LHRH antagonists, however, have been known to cause severe allergic reactions with a small number of patients. Because of this risk, LHRH antagonists are used only for patients with advanced prostate cancer or who refuse any other type of hormone therapy due to preference or other side effects.

LHRH antagonist is injected through the buttocks at a doctor’s office. The injection will be made by either a doctor or a nurse. Two weeks after the initial injection, the patient receives his second injection. Two weeks after the second injection, the patient receives his third injection. After this first month, the patient receives the antagonist only once a month. Patients are strongly encouraged not to miss appointments, and to schedule those appointments as close to exactly four weeks later as they can. After an injection, a patient will also wait at his doctor's office for another 30 minutes to ensure that he does not have an allergic reaction.

LHRH antagonists are usually not recommended for patients who have irregular heart beat, liver problems, or osteoporosis. Patients who weigh over 225 pounds are also not candidates for LHRH antagonists. Patients who have one or more of these physical criteria should speak with their doctors about whether LHRH antagonists are right for them. LHRH antagonists could exacerbate irregular heart beat and liver problems in addition to risking decreasing bone density. Researchers have found that weighing over 225 pounds could dramatically decrease the effectiveness of the antagonists.

After the first injection, patients should receive a blood test once every 8 weeks to ensure that his levels of testosterone have dropped to castrate level. Patients should also consider tests to monitor the functioning of the liver. Patients who undergo extensive LHRH antagonist hormone therapy run a higher risk of developing osteoporosis.

If patients experience a changing in the rhythm of their heartbeat or fainting, they should contact their doctor immediately.

 
 
 
 

 
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