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Prostate Cancer
Treatment Guide™

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
Survival Rates
Prostate Cancer
Side Effects
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Hormone
Therapy

Prostate Hormone Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth. Prostate Hormone
Therapy

Prostate hormone therapy suppresses, blocks, or eliminates testosterone to slow the tumor’s growth.

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Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment. Hormone Therapy Uses

Therapy can slow the tumor’s growth or lower a PSA level; it may be used before, during, or after other treatment.

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Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection. Shrinking the Prostate

Surgical castration patients return home the day of the surgery. Treatment is given orally or by injection.

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Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments. Hormone
Therapy Effects

Hormone therapy does not destroy cancer but research has shown effectiveness in enhancing other treatments.

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Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use. Hormone Therapy
Side Effects

May cause impotence, weight gain, hot flashes, fatigue, loss of muscle mass; and hormone “flare” in LHRH use.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Hormone Therapy.

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Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures. Hormone Therapy
Videos

Click here to view Hormone Therapy procedures.

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Hormone Therapy
Experiences


Click here to share your Hormone Therapy experiences.Hormone Therapy
Experiences

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostate Cancer Hormone Therapy – Surgical Castration

The testicles produce 90 to 95 percent of the male body’s testosterone and testosterone fuels the growth of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer hormone therapy works by removing the testicles and “starving” the prostate cancer by depriving them of testosterone. The removal of testosterone from the body will slow the growth of the prostate, but the removal will not destroy cancer. Eventually the body will readjust and the prostate cancer will continue to grow.

Castration is also called orchiectomy or surgical castration. Surgical castration is the removal of the testicles, not the scrotum, which is a sac that contains the testicles. Patients who undergo surgical castration may also opt for testicular prostheses, which are made out of silicone. There are no studies that show silicone prostheses have any negative effect on general health, as in the case of silicone breast implants.

For the operation, some men do not require general anesthesia, but light sedation and local anesthesia. The surgeon makes a small incision in the scrotum, through which the testicles are eased out. The surgeon then clamps and sutures the blood vessels, removes the testicles, then closes the incision. Most patients return home the same day or the next, depending on their general health before the operation.

The goal of surgical castration is to have the testosterone level drop to what is called castration level. Since the testicles make about 90 percent of the body’s hormones, testosterone drops within 3 to 12 hours. Patients with prostate cancer bone metastasis often immediately feel symptoms, such as bone pain, begin to subside. Researchers are still debating whether or not the 5 to 10 percent that’s left circulating in the body have a significant affect on the desired results. If orchiectomy patients opt for an anti-androgen to ablate the remaining testosterone, it is called combined androgen blockade.

Orchiectomy was once the only option for hormone therapy in prostate cancer treatment. Hormone therapy, therefore, was used only as a last resort because the effects of surgical castration are not reversible. Understandably, many men today will opt for chemical castration through the LHRH and GnRH antagonists and agonists because their effects are reversible once medication is stopped. Castration is not reversible, though some men opt for orchiectomy because LHRH and GnRH agonists and antagonists can be very costly, in addition to causing more unpleasant and severe side effects.

 
 
 
 

 
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