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Prostate Cancer Treatment Guide

Treatment
Description
Prostate Cancer
Patient Profile
Prostate Cancer
Treatments
Prostate Cancer
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Prostate Cancer
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Prostatectomy

Prostate Surgery

Prostatectomy is the removal of the prostate by surgical incisions in abdomen or perineum, or small incisions and laparoscope use. Prostate Surgery

Prostatectomy is the removal of the prostate by surgical incisions in abdomen or perineum, or small incisions and laparoscope use.

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Prostatectomy Patients

Prostatectomy carries surgical risks and possible side effects so is usually recommended only for younger patients who are in otherwise good health. Prostatectomy Patients

Prostatectomy carries surgical risks and possible side effects so is usually recommended only for younger patients who are in otherwise good health.

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Prostate Removal

Length of prostatectomy surgeries, recovery times, and hospital stays vary according to specific prostatectomy procedure. Prostate Removal

Length of prostatectomy surgeries, recovery times, and hospital stays vary according to specific prostatectomy procedure.

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Prostatectomy
Survival Rates

Multiple long-term studies indicate recurrence-free success rates over 90%. Prostatectomy
Survival Rates

Multiple long-term studies indicate recurrence-free success rates over 90%.

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Risks of
Prostatectomy

Surgical complications, impotence, or incontinence may occur. Risks of
Prostatectomy

Surgical complications, impotence, or incontinence may occur.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Prostatectomy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Prostatectomy.

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Prostatectomy
Videos

Click here to view Prostatectomy procedures. Prostatectomy
Videos

Click here to view Prostatectomy procedures.

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Prostatectomy
Experiences


Click here to share your Prostatectomy experiences.Prostatectomy
Experiencse

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Hormone
Therapy

Radiation
Therapy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer Patients

There are three basic types of radical prostatectomy procedures. Here are some guidelines to help patients decide if prostate surgery is right for them:

  • Tumor is confined to prostate gland (stages T1 and T2)
  • No regional lymph node metastasis (stage N0)
  • No distant metastasis (stage M0)
  • Under the age of 75

Not meeting all of the above criteria, however, does eliminate prostatectomy as a possible treatment option. Read on to find out who’s receiving what prostatectomy and why. Then speak to a doctor to see if prostatectomy may be right for you.


Age and Health of Prostate Cancer Patients
Prostatectomies are generally a good option for those under the age of 75. For example, based on current data, if a 60-year-old prostate cancer patient has a Gleason score of 7, he can expect to live about 10 more years. Because of the risks and side effects involved with the prostate surgery, doctors generally do not recommend prostatectomy unless a patient can reasonably expect to benefit for another 10 years. The age of 75, however, is used only as a benchmark. Some surgeons will not perform a prostatectomy for any patient over 75, while other physicians are more lenient.

A patient’s age is generally treated as a relative factor. Younger patients who suffer from other health problems, especially cardiovascular problems, are poor candidates of surgery. Radical prostatectomy involves surgical risks including heart attacks, blood clots, strokes, and, in rare cases, death. In some instances, a doctor may feel a patient’s general health disqualifies him for prostatectomy as prostate cancer treatment.

Prostate Cancer Stage
During the prostate surgery, the surgeon will attempt to remove the lymph nodes. During the retropubic prostatectomy, when the incision is in the lower abdomen and about 8 cm long, the surgeon removes the lymph nodes near the bladder and gives them to a pathologist. If the pathologist finds that the cancer has metastasized, the surgery is stopped. Patients who are in the N1 stage will not be helped by prostatectomy because the surgery can remove the disease only when it is confined to the prostate gland.

Prostate cancer patients, who are in the M1 stage (distant metastasis to other parts of the body, usually the bones) are not candidates for prostatectomy. The removal of the prostate gland will not slow the progression of the disease. These patients should consider other treatments. Patients who are in stages T1 or T2 do not exhibit any extension out of the prostate gland and should consider prostatectomy. These patients may also be eligible for the nerve-sparing technique that can preserve erectile function.

Choosing a Prostatectomy
Patients who suffer from obesity are generally candidates only for the radical perineal prostatectomy. The perineal prostatectomy goes through the perineum, and, in obese patients, perineal prostatectomy becomes much easier for the surgeon and lowers the risk of complications for the patient.

Patients who exhibit pubic arch interference may not be good candidates for the perineal prostatectomy. Pubic arch interference may complicate perineal prostatectomy. These patients may be better candidates for the retropubic or the laparoscopic procedures.

The choice of procedure should ultimately be determined by the surgeon’s experience. If a surgeon has performed 100 robotic prostatectomies in the last year but no laparoscopic prostatectomies, the patient should rely on the surgeon’s expertise as the best bet for a successful procedure.

 
 
 

 
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