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Prostate Cancer Treatment Guide

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Prostate Cancer
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Prostate Cancer
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Prostate Cancer
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Robotic
Prostatectomy

Robotic Prostatectomy

Robotic prostate surgery is a minimally invasive procedure involving the removal of the prostate and surrounding cancerous tissue.Robotic Prostate Surgery

Robotic prostatectomy surgery is a minimally invasive procedure involving the removal of the prostate and surrounding cancerous tissue.

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Robotic Prostatectomy Patients

Minimally invasive robotic surgery is reserved only for patients whose cancer is confined to the prostate gland. Robotic Prostatectomy Patients

Minimally invasive robotic surgery is reserved only for patients whose cancer is confined to the prostate gland.

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Prostate Removal

During a robotic prostatectomy, surgeons remove the prostate gland through a series of small incisions using surgeon-controlled robotic arms.Robotic Prostate Removal

During a robotic prostatectomy, surgeons remove the prostate gland through a series of small incisions using surgeon-controlled robotic arms.

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Robotic Prostatectomy Outcomes

Clinical research indicates comparable surgical outcomes when compared to traditional retropubic procedures.Robotic Prostatectomy
Survival Rates

Clinical research indicates comparable surgical outcomes when compared to traditional retropubic procedures.

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Risks of Robotic Prostate Removal

Impotence, incontinence, blood loss, and other surgical complications are known risk factors of robotic prostate removal. Risks of Robotic-Assisted
Prostatectomy

Impotence, incontinence, blood loss, and other surgical complications are known risk factors of robotic prostate removal.

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Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Robotic Prostatectomy.Prostate News

Click here for the latest news on Robotic Prostatectomy.

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Robotic Prostatectomy
Videos

Click here to view Robotic Prostatectomy procedures. Robotic Prostatectomy
Videos

Click here to view Robotic Prostatectomy procedures.

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Robotic Prostatectomy
Experiences


Click here to share your Robotic Prostatectomy experiences.Robotic Prostatectomy
Experiencse

Click here to share your Robotic Prostatectomy experiences.

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Brachytherapy

Chemotherapy

Cryotherapy & Cryosurgery

Hormone
Therapy

Radiation
Therapy

Prostatectomy

Watchful
Waiting

Complementary
and
Alternative Medicine

High Intensity
Focused
Ultrasound (HIFU)

Emerging Technologies

 

Robotic Prostate Surgery:
Procedural Complications & Post-Operative Side Effects

No surgery is free of the risk of complications or post-operative side effects. Though minimally invasive, a robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy is no different and presents a particular set of risks that could negatively impact a patient’s recovery and overall quality of life.  The likelihood of complication is dependent upon many factors: a patient’s age, general health, and cancer stage, as well as the surgeon’s level of expertise can all influence the outcomes of a robotic-assisted prostatectomy. In general, clinical studies on robotic surgery for prostate cancer, such as the da Vinci® robotic prostatectomy, reveal outcomes that are equal to, and oftentimes, less than the known complications of traditional open prostatectomy procedures.

Surgical Complications of a Robotic Prostatectomy
Though low, there are a number of complications that could occur during or after a robotic-assisted prostatectomy, one of which is blood loss. As the prostate gland is nestled amongst a number of large blood vessels, intraoperative and post-operative blood loss is a known complication of a radical prostatectomy. As robotic prostatectomy surgery is a minimally invasive prostate cancer treatment, the risk of blood loss is substantially less when compared to traditional open procedure outcomes. According to a study conducted on patients of the Henry Ford Health System, 97 percent of robotic prostatectomy patients were not anemic at the time of discharge. Other complications include, but are not limited to, a deep venous thrombosis or blood clot originating in the legs or pelvic region, as well as a herniation of the bowl occurring at the port site, or area where the endoscope and robotic instrumentation enter the abdominal cavity.  

Incontinence & Impotence after Prostatectomy Surgery
Due to the prostate’s location and anatomical components, incontinence and erectile dysfunction (impotence) are possible side effects of a radical robotic prostate cancer surgery. After the procedure, patients will experience some degree of incontinence during the recovery period. Why does this occur? Control of urinary function is made possible by two muscles, one of which resides within the prostate. After the prostate is removed and the urethra reconnected to the bladder, patients may experience incontinence until the remaining muscle responsible for urinary control strengthens over time.

Perhaps the greatest concern for men undergoing a radical prostatectomy, like the Da Vinci® robotic prostate surgery, is the risk of sexual dysfunction or the inability to achieve or hold an erection. During surgery, the nerve bundles responsible for erectile function may be removed if cancerous, stretched, or cut, however with early diagnosis, many patients may be candidates for a nerve-sparing prostatectomy. In this procedure, surgeons carefully preserve the neurovascular nerve bundles surrounding the prostate in hopes of maintaining sexual function. According to reports issued by the Vattikuti Institute of the Henry Ford Health System, 97 percent of patients who had undergone a nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy at their facility experienced a return of sexual function. Of this group,  84 percent reported erections equal to those experienced before surgery and 13 percent reported erections strong enough for intercourse, but weaker than erections experienced prior to surgery. In terms of recovery, restoration of erectile function may take a period up to one to three years and is influenced by many outside factors including the patient’s age, emotional state, level of sexual activity, and the surgeon’s ability to successful spare neurovascular nerve bundles.

 
 
 

 
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